"Ralph Breaks the Internet" Movie Review

Updated on May 14, 2019
popcollin profile image

Collin's been a movie critic since 2009. In real life he works in marketing and is also a novelist ("Good Riddance" published in Oct 2015).

Ralph Breaks the Internet
Ralph Breaks the Internet | Source

Back in 2012, we jumped into the hyper-kinetic color-blast world of Sugar Rush, the video game within the movie Wreck-It Ralph—a setting so over-the-top that it made a Japanese game show seem like a staid PBS documentary. I suspect that’s part of what kept the film from being an unqualified success; it finished the year outside the top ten at the box office, behind Brave, The Lorax, and even Madagascar 3.

But Disney liked the returns enough to order up a sequel anyway, and thus we find ourselves headed back into the colorful mayhem, with Ralph Breaks the Internet. Though it ends up feeling a little more muted by comparison (how could it not?), it still feels as though the filmmakers were just trying to cram as much candy-coated crap as they could into two hours, in the hopes that something would stick.

John C. Reilly reprises his role as the titular video game character, and Sarah Silverman’s Vanellope von Schweetz gets a beefier role, landing as Ralph’s best friend and little buddy throughout. When the film opens, they’re still living inside their respective games at Litwak's Family Fun Center & Arcade, but one day the steering wheel on the Sugar Rush console breaks and good ol’ Mr. Litwak can’t afford a replacement, so Ralph and Vanellope take things into their own hands and head to the internet to find a new one.

Imagined as a colossal metropolis, the internet is a sprawling city of high-rises and storefronts. Google, Amazon, and (natch) OhMyDisney all feature prominently, and the filmmakers take every advantage to inject meta-humor throughout the proceedings. Ralph and Vanellope’s first stop is at eBay, where they try to win the auction for the steering wheel, but their collective eBay ignorance leads them to win with a $27,001 bid… on the $200 item.

Not having any cash (since they’re, ya know, just a collection of pixels), they decide to click on a spam ad, which, long-story-short, leads them to the world of Slaughter Race, a Grand Theft Auto-type game featuring Shank (Gal Gadot). Vanellope fits into the world splendidly, able to strut her stuff in a fast-and-furious car chase. At the same time, Ralph is trying to earn some money himself by becoming a viral video star on BuzzzTube.

And that’s only the first half of the movie.

From there we get into a subplot involving Ralph’s jealousy at Vanellope’s success, a visit to the dark web, and a 20-story-tall computer virus monster, as well as what is undoubtedly the best part of the movie—a hilarious little (too little) side story with all the Disney Princesses. In a fun throwback, all of the original voice actresses (except for Snow White and Aurora) return to voice their characters in a pair of scenes that alone makes Ralph worth the price of admission.

The kids in the audience will have as much fun at Ralph as being set free in a candy store (with the same result), and if you can somehow get your brood to stay in their seats for more than thirty seconds at a time, consider it a victory. For adults, though, Ralph ultimately winds up feeling as over-stuffed as the Thanksgiving turkey, and the predictable third-act climax does everything possible to erase all the clever humor and catered-to-parents fun that came before it.

Memo to the Disney folks: If you need an inspired and potential-laden idea for your next film, you might be onto something with the whole Princesses bit. As for this whole Wreck-It Ralph thing, though, it may be time to just say ‘game over’.

Rating

2.5/5 stars

'Ralph Breaks the Internet' trailer

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, reelrundown.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://maven.io/company/pages/privacy

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)